Cannabis Charity

$4k ‘Elephant Tusk’ Joint Sold at Auction

Last night, the new premium cannabis company Stone Road Farms hosted what is sure to be one of the coolest parties of the summer. Thrown at Fig Earth Supplies in the heart of Downtown Los Angeles, this party had it all: a full bar, areas where party-goers could customize their own joints (plus pocket a few dozen pre-rolls of Stone Road Farms’ own harvest, and a live performance by the critically acclaimed Gabriel Garzon Montano.

Most importantly, this party was for a good cause.

The event centered around the auction of what has been dubbed “The World’s Most Expensive Joint.” Crafted by the world-famous joint artist Weaver, it was a cornucopia of flower, bubble hash, and concentrates donated by the host as well as Cannabis Cup winners Team Elite Genetics and Soilgrown Solventless, all wrapped up in a 24K gold package. In total, the joint was 30 inches long and contained over a pound of cannabis flower, two ounces of bubble hash, and six ounces of concentrate.

But the most notable part about this joint was the shape. Weaver worked his magic and formed this smokable work of art in the shape of an elephant tusk to represent the beneficiary of the auction: The African Wildlife Foundation.

$4k ‘Elephant Tusk’ Joint Sold at Auction

Chloé Harper Gold/ High Times

“Elephants are being slaughtered in unprecedented numbers, “Stone Road Farms founder Lex Corwin said. “Our generation could literally wipe the most majestic land animal off the face of the earth for all future generations.”

According to The African Wildlife Foundation, disease and natural disasters are not the biggest threats to the continent’s delicate ecosystem; the most dangerous threats to African wildlife—and the planet as a whole—are humans. Elephants and rhinoceroses are especially at risk of poaching due to the high prices that their body parts garner on the black market. Other animals, like big cats and primates, are also at risk.

The fact that the joint was formed in the shape of an elephant tusk worked on a few different levels. It was beautiful, certainly, but it was a sobering reminder that elephants are murdered for the very body part the joint resembles. It was also a reminder of the task at hand: raising money to help stop poaching.

To Read The Rest Of This Article By Chloé Harper Gold on High Times

Click Here

Published: June 15, 2018

Founder & Interim Editor of L.A. Cannabis News

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