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Mayors From Across U.S. Call On Feds To Deschedule Marijuana

A group representing mayors of cities across the country is pushing the federal government to enact a series of major marijuana law reforms.

The U.S. Conference of Mayors is also calling on cities in states that have legalized cannabis to expunge people’s past convictions.

“The looming threat of federal prosecution or shutdown lends uncertainty to states and local governments and legally compliant commercial cannabis business operators, patients and adult-use consumers, and harms state and local efforts to regulate cannabis for the safety and health of its residents,” reads one of the two measures adopted by the mayors group on Monday.

“The United States Conference of Mayors urges the White House, U.S. Department of Justice and the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration to immediately remove cannabis from the schedule of the CSA to enable U.S. federal banking regulators to permanently authorize financial institutions to provide services to commercial cannabis businesses, and increase the safety of the public.”

The mayors are also asking federal officials to maintain Obama-era guidance that provides some protections to banks that work with cannabis businesses.

And the measure—sponsored by the mayors of Denver, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Seattle and other cities—presses Congress to pass a series of amendments to federal spending bills that would continue to shield state medical marijuana programs and add new protections for broader recreational laws as well as additional reforms “to address financial services access challenges for commercial cannabis businesses and extend safe and legal access to veterans.”

The other resolution, on expungements, details the racially “discriminatory enforcement” of prohibition and “calls on local governments, where marijuana has been legalized, to act, moving with urgency to vacate misdemeanor marijuana convictions for conduct that is now deemed legal.”

“The decades long and failed war on drugs has devastated communities of color across our nation and incarcerated a disproportionate and unprecedented amount of people from those communities.”

“A drug conviction, even for the misdemeanor offense of possession of marijuana, can have significant negative consequences affecting a person’s employment opportunities, education options, qualification for government benefits and programs, travel, and immigration status,” the measure says. “Vacating these convictions serves as evidence that the criminal justice system acknowledges the racial disproportionality of enforcement of drug laws and is willing to address that injustice.”

“When government policies create injustice, the government has an obligation to correct that injustice.”

The measures were approved by the Conference’s Criminal and Social Justice Committee on Saturday and then adopted on Monday by the full body, which represents mayors leading the 1,408 U.S. cities with populations of 30,000 or more.

In a related development, several major city mayors are joining together to form a new organization to pressure the federal government to modernize its cannabis laws and to “share best practices among local governments to help advance responsible local control over marijuana.”

To Read The Rest Of This Article By Tom Angell on Marijuana Moment

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Published: June 11, 2018

Founder & Interim Editor of L.A. Cannabis News

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